Watching The Donald Be “Presidential”: Episode XXV


It’s nearly impossible to keep up with the gaffes, mistakes, flubs and screw-ups by the president-elect. WC has been forced to limit his focus to a few narrow categories. But one thing seems indisputable: the Trumpster has the thinnest skin since Dick Nixon, and we all know how that turned out.

In her excellent review of Trump Grill (or “Grille”), Tina Nguyen, writing in Vanity Fair, summarized her dining experience at The Donald’s Trump Tower restaurant: “[I]t was slop: as soon as I got home, I brushed my teeth twice and curled up in bed until the nausea passed.”1 The Trumpster was unable to control himself and launched a tweet attack on Vanity Fair in response. And, true to form, The Donald attacked the magazine’s editor instead of addressing the review. As well as lying about the magazine’s circulation. Strange how a guy who doesn’t have time for intelligence briefings has time to read restaurant reviews in Vanity Fair and respond to them. Seriously, this guy is about to become the commander-in-chief of the most powerful nation in the world and he’s concerned about restaurant reviews?

The Trumpster was apparently unhappy with the performance of Arnold Schwarzenegger as his successor on Celebrity Apprentice. The Donald tweeted out:

Wow, the ratings are in and Arnold Schwarzenegger go “swamped” (destroyed) by comparison to the ratings machine, DJT. So much for being a movie star. And that was the season 1 compared to season 14. Now compare him to my season 1. But who cares, he supported Kasich & Hillary.

It’s ironic, because the Trumpster remains an executive producer of the fake reality show. If he hurts the ratings, he hurts himself. Schwarzenegger responded with a quote from Lincoln’s inaugural address. WC never thought there would be a day that Schwarzenegger was classy, but in comparison to The Donald it’s pretty easy. Again, the guy with the most important job in the world is worried about ratings on a reality television show?

It’s clear that the Trumpster doesn’t give much thought to the tweets before he sends them. It’s also clear he dislikes having his nose rubbed in the fact. The Donald announced he was relying on WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange for his intelligence:2

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When that Evil Media – and a couple thousand sites on social media – called The Donald out for giving more credibility to a fleeing felon than the U.S. intelligence services, predictably enough, the Trumpster got defensive.

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“I simply state what he states.” Isn’t that just precious? Isn’t that just so presidential? Isn’t that stunningly thin-skinned?

Then there’s recent, unsubstantiated reports that Russia has dirt on The Donald, and that the dirt explains both Putin’s support of the Trumpster and the Trumpster’s crush on Putin. After dissing the reports at this “press conference,” the Trumpster couldn’t let it go:

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If WC may quote Shakespeare out of context, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”3 With The Donald, it’s hard to tell if he is reacting to the truth of the claims or just being his usually, thin-skinned self. And it doesn’t bode well for his conflicted relationship with U.S. intelligence agencies. The point isn’t whether the allegations of political dirt and blackmail are true; the point is that, once again, there’s this thin-skinned, complete overreaction to the story.

WC is certain his readers can come up with dozens of other examples; these instances are not exhaustive.

This level of insecurity might be acceptable in a reality TV “star” but when it’s the guy with the codes to the U.S. nuclear arsenal, well, there’s reason to be concerned. Or maybe terrified.

 

 


  1.  WC wishes it were possible to follow Ms. Nguyen’s solution for the next four years. 
  2. Note another favorite Trumpster rhetorical trick: the diversion, also called the Straw Man Fallacy. The ease with which the president-elect uses fallacial arguments is disturbing. The failure by his supporters to be concerned by his rhetorical sleazeball tactics is even more disturbing. He had made the ad hominem fallacy mainstream. 
  3. Queen Gertrude to Hamlet, Hamlet, Act III, Scene 2, line 219. 
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