Why Not Motmots?


Motmots, the fourteen species of the family Momotidae, are colorful, long-tailed birds of Central and South America. Like Kingfishers, they nest in long tunnel-like burrows in dirt banks, but they are not closely related to Kingfishers. For such a colorful, charismatic bird, they are remarkably poorly studied. As just one example of the challenges presented…

The Bird Photo Project: A Setback


Long-time readers will recall WC, asked the seemingly simple question of how many different bird species he had photographed, has been struggling for the last four years to provide an answer. WC, as recently as July of this year, had the illusion he was making progress. Then the American Ornithological Society released the latest update…

Big Psittacidae


The Macaws, spread across three or four genera, are the largest members of the New World parrot family, the Psittacidae. There are at least seventeen Macaw species, but WC has only photographed a few of them. In an egregious instance of the Magpie Principle, here are four of those species. The etymology of “macaw” is…

SLiPs and CLiPs


This post is for Ron Dudley, retired biology teacher,, astonishingly good bird photographer and, WC is pleased to to report, a good friend of WC’s. Ron is recovering from surgery at present, and this blog post is WC’s way of wishing him a speedy recovery. Most parasites are SLiPs. That is, they are Simple Lifecycle…

Cruising Rio Pixiam


WC is more or less chained to his Polar Care Cube, a nifty little machine that circulates ice cold water through a pad on his swollen right knee. Bird photography is presently a goal, not a possibility. So WC is revisiting earlier birding trips. This one was in 2014. Rio Pixiam is one of the…