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Red-necks Revisited


WC has written earlier about this year’s Red-necked Grebe nest at Wander Lake, on Wedgewood Wildlife Sanctuary. There are developments. The female Grebe laid three eggs. When WC was there last, one egg had hatched. Grebe checks usually ride on a parent’s back, generally tucked under a wing. But they will emerge to receive food from the other…

Harlequin Duck Drake, Gulkana River, May 2015

Harlies


The Harlequin Duck is easily Alaska’s most colorful waterfowl. Nothing else comes close. Harlequin Ducks – “Harlies,”in birder slang – are sea ducks that move inland to white water rivers and streams to breed. The species’ name come from the comic servant character in the Italian Commedia dell’arte. You can see that it is apt,…

Red-necked Grebe greeting ritual

Red-necks


There’s a Red-necked Grebe nest on a local pond. Assuming the Yahoos leave it alone, WC will track progress of the breeding effort over the summer. Red-necked Grebes are a large, highly pugnacious grebe that takes a variety of aquatic prey with its robust bill. They build a nest of marshy plants, emergent and sub-emergent vegetation.…